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The English Bread-Book for Domestic Use Eliza Acton

The English Bread-Book for Domestic Use

Eliza Acton

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230325804
Paperback
44 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... SECTION IV. BREADMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... SECTION IV. BREAD RECEIPTS. PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 1. The first thing required for making wholesome bread is the utmost cleanliness- the next is the soundness and sweetness of all the ingredients used for it- and, in addition to these, there must be attention and care through the whole process. 2. An almost certain way of spoiling dough is to leave it half made, and to allow it to become cold before it is finished. The other most common causes of failure will be found at page 122. 3. To make bread on a moderate scale, nothing further is required than a kneading-trough or tub, or a large earthenware pan, which is more easily than anything else kept clean and dry- a hair sieve for straining yeast occasionally, and one or two strong spoons. All wooden vessels used in preparing it, should be kept exclusively for the purpose, and be well scalded, dried thoroughly, and set away in a well ventilated, and not in a damp place, after every baking. They should also be wiped free from dust when again brought out for use. 4. The kneading-tub or pan should be of sufficient size and depth to contain the quantity of flour required for bread without being much more than half filled, as there should be space enough to knead the dough freely, without danger of throwing the flour over the edges, and also to allow for its rising. 5. When dough is moulded into loaves, it should be lightly handled or kneaded- for the hard and continued working which is necessary to blend the ingredients when it is first made, would have a very bad effect on it when it is ready for the oven. If baked in tins, they should be less than two-thirds filled with it. 6. Bread made entirely with milk becomes dry much sooner than that which is moistened with a portion of water. One...